Downtown Winnipeg

James A. Jaworski

April 1, 1969


Table of Contents

1. INTRODUCTION
2. DOWNTOWN TRENDS
1. THE [XMLmind] OF DOWNTOWN IN THE NORTH AMERICAN CITY
2. THE DECLINE OF DOWNTOWN WINNIPEG
3. POPULATION TRENDS
4. RETAIL TRENDS
5. CONSTRUCTION VALUES
6. MANUFACTURING TRENDS
7. WHOLESALING AND WAREHOUSING TRENDS
8. SERVICE INDUSTRY TREND
9. DOWNTOWN TODAY
10. THE CASE OF OTHER CITIES
11. WINNIPEG'S OPPORTUNITY
3. PHYSICAL CONDITIONS
1. GENERAL [XMLmind]
2. PARKS, PLAYGROUNDS AND SCHOOLS
3. PARKING AREAS
4. CONDITION OF BUILDINGS
5. HEIGHTS OF [XMLmind] (NON-RESIDENTIAL)
6. AGE OF BUILDINGS (NON-RESIDENTIAL)
4. ECONOMIC CONDITIONS
1. BUSINESS PREMISES
2. FLOOR AREAS
3. OCCUPANCY AND VACANCY
4. ANNUAL RENTAL VALUE
5. ASSESSMENT VALUES
6. EMPLOYMENT
7. MARKET AREAS
8. STABILITY AND MOVEMENT FROM AREA
5. SOCIAL CONDITIONS
1. POPULATION
2. HOUSEHOLDS
3. FAMILIES
4. SEX RATIOS
5. AGE AND SEX DISTRIBUTION
5.1. AGE DISTRIBUTION
5.2. SEX DISTRIBUTION
6. MARITAL STATUS
7. INCOME
8. EMPLOYMENT
9. JOURNEY TO WORK
10. OWNER-TENANT RATIOS
11. ETHNIC ORIGINS
12. MOBILITY
13. ATTITUDE OF [XMLmind] TOWARD AREA
14. COMMUNITY FACILITIES
6. THE BASIS OF A PLAN
1. PRESENT INDUSTRIAL & COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL
2. THE NEED FOR DOWNTOWN RESIDENTS
3. THE [XMLmind] FAMILY DWELLING TRADITION
4. THE SHIFT TO APARTMENTS
5. THE APARTMENT MARKET TODAY
6. THE FUTURE APARTMENT MARKET
7. LOCATION OF APARTMENTS
8. MEASURES TO MAKE DOWNTOWN ATTRACTIVE
9. PARKING
10. WEATHER-PROTECTED PEDESTRIAN SYSTEMS
11. OPEN SPACE
12. PUBLIC RECREATION
13. THE ELEMENTS OF THE PLAN
7. THE DOWNTOWN PLAN
1. BASIC PREMISES
2. THE BROADWAY-ST. MARY SECTOR
3. THE RESIDENTIAL BLOCKS
4. THE NON-RESIDENTIAL BLOCKS
5. THE CONVENTION CENTRE
6. SCHOOLS
7. THE ELLICE-CUMBERLAND SECTOR
8. OTHER PROPOSALS
8. IMPLEMENTATION
1. THE PLAN PERIOD
2. THE FEASIBILITY OF THE APARTMENT PROPOSALS
3. THE FEASIBILITY OF THE PEDESTRIAN SYSTEM
4. PUBLIC ACTION